Commission for Pennsic 2018

A Larder Fit for a Laurel

This documentation is for a commission I received for a number of preserved goods for a Laurel to take with her to Pennsic 2018. While it does pull some information from my "Roman Pickles", and the "Salted Fowl, Preserved in Rendered Fat", much of the information is new documentation for me.

The commission consists of the following items:
-Sauerkraut
-Pickled Asparagus, in the Roman style
-Chicken sausage, made using a recipe in Martino's The Art of Cooking
-A Spanish chorizo, dated to 1500
-Prosciutto, according to Messisbugo

A copy of my documentation can be viewed here. (The link will open in a new tab.)

Kingdom Arts & Sciences 2017

Brewing a 13th Century Mead

In this documentation, I explore a 13th Century mead recipe. This is my first foray into brewing of any capacity, and was well received by the judges. The use of bread yeast instead of a proper brewing yeast is a point that I've explored since this work was done, with great success.

CAUTION: This brew can be highly effervescent! Make sure all fermentation is completed before bottling. Otherwise you may end up with bottles exploding, which can be both dangerous and messy.

A copy of my documentation can be viewed here. (The link will open in a new tab.)

Queen's Prize Tournament 2016

Salted Fowl, Preserved in Rendered Fat

By far my most involved project. This preservation calls for numerous steps, over a great deal of time. There are some things that I would like to have done better, but having spent so much time with this, I can readily recount the methodology for future attempts. At some point, I am hoping to turn this project into a "Magnum Opus" of sorts, sourcing the raw materials to make any and all of the foodstuffs required to make this. Some day...

A copy of my documentation can be viewed here. (The link will open in a new tab.)

Queen's Prize Tournament 2014

Roman Pickles

The project that started it all! For this Queen's Prize Tournament, I was wanting to do some fabric-based project, but couldn't manage to make it work. I was only casually researching food preservation when someone had mentioned this recipe as an option for me to pursue. The reception I got was astounding, with many people stopping by my display repeatedly throughout the day, just to grab "one more bite" of the samples I had out.

A copy of my documentation can be viewed here. (The link will open in a new tab.)